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Author Topic: Cordless Impact Wrench  (Read 9114 times)
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« on: September 07, 2011, 05:14:42 PM »

I'm looking for a cordless Impact wrench so that I can quickly take my tires on & off at the Autocross events. What size bit do I need as well as the amount of voltage for the drill? Any help is greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

FG
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« Reply #1 on: September 07, 2011, 06:07:20 PM »

I don't have any experience with cordless impacts, but you generally can't go wrong with Milwaukee, DeWalt or Bosch.  I'm sure there are cheaper options out there though.

If you already have a cordless drill, you could just break all of the lugnuts by hand and then zip them off with the drill.  I put the lugnuts on with the drill and then torque them with a torque wrench.
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« Reply #2 on: September 07, 2011, 06:48:40 PM »

I use a Dewalt impact driver and love it for removing wheels. More than enough power with a full charge. Socket size is going to be different from car to car.
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« Reply #3 on: September 07, 2011, 07:04:15 PM »

I believe with the drill and some impacts, you will need something like this: http://www.amazon.com/Power-Extension-Socket-Adaptor-Drills/dp/B0002TW1D8

If you get an impact with a square head for sockets, get a 1/2" one.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2011, 07:06:12 PM by blue06civic » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2011, 12:39:40 PM »

I have an Hitachi 1/2 drive, 18V using a Li-Ion battery... it only weighs ~3 lbs. It has two settings, the highest will put out something like 115 ft-lbs. The lower setting puts out 75 ft-lbs, which is just what I torque my wheels to. I really like it and highly recommend it to anyone looking for this type of tool.
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« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2011, 06:54:56 AM »

24V Amazon Special, wasnt as expensive as it is now, i think it was $89.99.

http://www.amazon.com/Neiko-Industrial-Duty-24-Volt-2-Inch-Cordless/dp/B000KJDE54/ref=sr_1_32?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1317304332&sr=1-32

I know multiple people with the "Goodyear" brand impact from Pep boys that has lasted for a long time.

Id pick up a spare battery regardless of which one you go with though.
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« Reply #6 on: September 29, 2011, 05:27:37 PM »

We have Milwaukee battery powered drills at work and they are, without a doubt, the best ones we have ever used there. There are a few that are 5 years old that still work and the batteries have last just as long.
On their site you can also buy rebuilt tool that last just as long. Now they have started using Lithium-ion batteries.

http://www.cpomilwaukee.com/
« Last Edit: September 29, 2011, 05:41:22 PM by 90efcivic » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: September 30, 2011, 01:18:57 PM »

This is the one you need   Grin

http://trashcars.net/videos/43/milwaukee-commercial.html

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« Reply #8 on: September 30, 2011, 02:36:46 PM »

LOL! That's awesome!
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« Reply #9 on: October 01, 2011, 09:00:31 AM »

How important is it to get the 1/2" drive?  Seems like most of the ones out there are 1/4".
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« Reply #10 on: October 01, 2011, 10:10:45 AM »

I have a cheap harbor freight one with a 1/4" drive. I use a 1/4" to 1/2" adapter and it seems to be fine.
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« Reply #11 on: October 02, 2011, 01:12:59 PM »

It's all about how much torque you need... Sure, there are lots to choose from, but you basically get what you pay for. The 1/4 in drive units typically are less expensive but also provide less torque. Mine's a really lightweight 1/2 drive but I only use it to remove & replace wheel lugs, so I only need <85 ft*lbs.
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« Reply #12 on: October 02, 2011, 02:35:48 PM »

Good point.  Although if you plan to finish off with a torque wrench anyway, maybe the drill's torque isn't as critical?

(I actually used my breaker bar the other night to get the lug nuts most of the way on, then the torque wrench to finish.  Not as fast as a power tool, but surprisingly it wasn't too bad.)

(...then again, I was only doing one wheel.)
« Last Edit: October 02, 2011, 02:37:43 PM by whiteryder » Logged

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« Reply #13 on: October 03, 2011, 08:08:32 AM »

1/2" drives are nice to have for other uses too. Not sure if I would use a 1/4" on my wheels but I never really
thought about it either. Like Marc said, if your just putting lugs on and using a torque wrench to finish, it
would be ok.
« Last Edit: October 03, 2011, 08:10:57 AM by 90efcivic » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2011, 08:49:12 PM »

I found a reconditioned Milwaukee 12V 1/4" impact driver at Amazon for about $86 (including 2 Li-ion batteries and charger).  Got good reviews.  I decided that was cheap enough to be worth buying to see if it suffices.  Will report back.
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« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2011, 05:23:36 PM »

That little 12V guy works like a charm!!  Just changed my front brakes (first time I've done it myself in YEARS) in about 1/2 hour.  Used the breaker bar to break the nuts, the impact to get them off and back on, then the torque wrench to torque 'em down to 97.

That was so much fun I might have to do the rears next...  Smiley
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« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2011, 11:40:22 AM »

FYI, I checked the date on our batteries that we have, It is Aug. 2006. and they are NI-CAD batteries. So if the LI-ION are better, they may last ALOT longer. But it all depends on the usage too.
Glad to hear that the 12V 1/4" works that well.
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« Reply #17 on: October 08, 2011, 01:52:16 PM »


Thank you for the tip!

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« Reply #18 on: October 10, 2011, 11:15:30 AM »

The difference has to do with energy density or the capacity a battery has. Ni Cad (Nickel Cadmium) technology was replaced by Ni MH (nickel metal hydride) as NiMH has approximately twice the energy density of its NiCad counterpart. Li Ion has equivalent energy density to the Ni MH, but at about 2/3's the weight. Another benefit is  Lithium batteries retain their ability to hold a charge longer and they don't suffer "memory loss" issues Ni Cad are prone to, meaning that they don't require replacement as often as NiCad batteries do.
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« Reply #19 on: October 10, 2011, 08:50:16 PM »

The difference has to do with energy density or the capacity a battery has. Ni Cad (Nickel Cadmium) technology was replaced by Ni MH (nickel metal hydride) as NiMH has approximately twice the energy density of its NiCad counterpart. Li Ion has equivalent energy density to the Ni MH, but at about 2/3's the weight. Another benefit is  Lithium batteries retain their ability to hold a charge longer and they don't suffer "memory loss" issues Ni Cad are prone to, meaning that they don't require replacement as often as NiCad batteries do.

 Are Ni Cad the ones that sometimes reverse polarity within the cells in the battery pack ? Was that the memory loss issue ?
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« Reply #20 on: October 10, 2011, 09:26:38 PM »

No, the memory issue was when you charge them when they are let's say 1/2 run down, pretty soon they only have 1/2 capacity, and it continues to get worse over time. Best thing to do for them was to run them all the down when used and then fully recharge

John
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« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2011, 04:18:38 PM »

Are you sure it's a 1/4" and not a 3/8" you guys are adapting up to 1/2"? I wouldn't think a 1/4" would be up to the job. The impact I have at work is a Snap-On 18volt. I think it has about 300 ft lb torque. Will be coming home with me soon.
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« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2011, 04:33:43 PM »

I think it's a 1/4" female chuck, like the kind you would snap hex bits into.  Not a 1/4" drive ratchet head.
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« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2011, 04:36:36 PM »

I think it's a 1/4" female chuck, like the kind you would snap hex bits into.  Not a 1/4" drive ratchet head.

That's correct.  I have a set of 1/4" hex-to-square adapters in 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2".  (In fact I think it's the exact set Justin recommended earlier in this thread.)

I don't need a lot of torque as I'm not trying to torque the nuts down, just get them snug before finishing with the torque wrench.  (Plus I don't do this very often.)  The 12V seems to be fine for that purpose.
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« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2011, 06:51:45 PM »

Thank you for the tip!

Your Welcome. (better late than never).
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